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Archive for the 'Logic and Philosophy of Science' Category

Craig Venter on Race and Science

Craig Venter heavily influenced my views when I was writing my thesis. I came across this gem today and wanted to share. Craig Venter on Race and Science

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Is Bernie Sanders a Black Swan?

A black swan is an event or occurrence that deviates from normal expectations and is exceptionally difficult to predict. In philosophy, the Black Swan is a metaphor for a statement of impossibility and is generally used to highlight the problem of induction. It is most notably connected to Karl Popper, and his argument goes something like this:  Europeans for […]

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Frege, Hilbert, Intution and the Truth of Axioms

I recently came across this paper I wrote for a Philosophy of Math class as an undergrad at UC Irvine. Although this heady topic has been addressed in greater depths by far greater minds- I thought I would share. In the very least it is a superficial introduction to a deeply important debate that is […]

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MA Thesis Paper- Unravelling Race

The purpose of this paper is to explore the history of racial taxonomy and its enduring adverse effects on society. Within the context of the current race debate, the question of whether race is a legitimate term rests on how we define it, and in turn, how we deploy it. Recent developments in the biomedical […]

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Memory, Perception, and the A Priori define ‘The Given’

Some skeptical philosophers have wrongly characterized the class of basic beliefs in foundationalist theory known as ‘the given’ as a myth. In response, contemporary epistemologist Roderick Chisholm maintains that some beliefs can be self-justified independently, and that our other non-foundational beliefs, in turn, can be traced back to these basic beliefs. Yet, significantly, what does […]

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Some Brief Thoughts on Schlick and Hilbert

Moritz Schlick, inspired by David Hilbert’s work, took the concept of separating epistemology from its intuitive content much further. Schlick asserts, “it seemed intolerable that the ultimate principals- the axioms of geometry, which underlie all proofs and therefore are not themselves provable-should still owe their validity to intuition alone.” (The Nature of Knowledge, pg. 32) […]

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Some Thoughts on Carnap

The language of Physics, a language that both reports and predicts, is an inherently empirical language that must also make an appeal to the unobservable . As such, within the realm of Physics, distinctions need be clarified between two types of terms; those that are observable, and those that are theoretical, and, consequently, between two […]

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Some Thoughts on Quine

In Two Dogmas of Empiricism, Quine critiques several attempts of defining the analyticity of synonnimity, definition, and semantical rules. His first observation is that the notion of synonnimity is in just as much need of definition as the concept of analyticity itself. Additionally, if we are to choose the concept of truth by definition, or […]

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Object Language V Metalanguage (my brief thoughts on the difference)

By the simplest of terms, the object language is the language of science, and the metalanguage is the language of the philosophy of science. In other words, the metalanguage discusses and describes the object language. For example, the proposition all ravens are black exists in the object language, whereas the proposition all ravens are black […]

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The Biology of Race Unraveled

Within the context of the current race debate, the question of whether race is a legitimate term rests on how we define it, and how, in turn, we deploy it. Can we use race to mandate a belief in biological determinism, or should we use it as a genetic surrogate to achieve equality? And, importantly, […]

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